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Why do you like Gothic Romance? Please help me with my project!
#11
Wow you guys are practically doing all my research for me! Thank you! :p Hmm have to say I haven't really focused much on the importance of the house/setting yet in my project, but I'm definately starting to see that it's one of the key points of the whole genre!
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#12
I think that lack of blood and guts violence is a reason I love gothics. Of course there may be a murder or two but they are not gruesome. I have very "maiden aunt" sensibility about things like that for some reason.
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#13
bianca_notte, you haven't focussed on the importance of the house/setting, shame on you Wink
I remember years ago hearing gothic stories defined as a love affair between a woman and a spooky, old house. Setting is integral.
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#14
(08-24-2010, 01:51 PM)bianca_notte Wrote: Hi everyone!

I’m currently researching for an Extended Project Qualification on the origins and appeal of Gothic Romance literature, and in particular it's place in the world of literature today. As contemporary readers (and, in some cases, writers) of this genre, I’d be really grateful if some of you could give me an insight into why you like this genre. Is there anything that, for you, characterises the genre, and sets it apart from others?

What for you is the appeal of reading Gothic Romance? Do you think it appeals more to people of a certain gender or age? In your opinion, do people view it as a serious form of literature, or merely as a light, enjoyable read?

Recently there has been an influx of popular novels, films and TV series’ about vampires, werewolves and other supernatural concepts, following the ‘Twilight’ phenomenon. Do you see this as a welcome revival of the genre to the modern teenage conscience? Or maybe you think it is spoiling hundreds of years of tradition?

And finally, how do you view the portrayal of women within Gothic Romance literature? In the past, authors have been accused of only creating 2-dimensional female characters that conform to the stereotype of either the ‘damsel in distress’ or the ‘femme fetale’ – how far do you agree with this criticism?

Obviously, these are just guidelines, and any opinions/comments anyone would like to make outside of this would also be greatly appreciated!
Thanks!

I have always had a strange fascination with mansions, strange going on, things that go bump in the nite and passion. I will always gravitate towards a movie or novel that possess these points of interest to me.

I like the fact that now a days, women are capable of being the heroine in all ways
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#15
I so have to echo Random here. It's hard to remember these days, but those of us of a certain age (cough, cough) grew up in a time when the only characters in fiction who had adventures and accomplished things were male. The intelligent, independent heroine who relied on her wits rather than her beauty is so appealing.

The other thing that's so wonderful about Gothic romance is that the heroine tames a very dangerous male. This is true to some extent in romance but even more so in Gothics. He may, literally, cause her death (or in the case of Jane Eyre, he may cause her to lose her integrity, which for her is almost worse than death).

As far as vampires and werewolves...they've gone so far afield from the original they're a whole different animal. I don't consider them relevant to Gothics. I don't worry about Twilight. It is what it is and has no effect on me.
.
(08-24-2010, 01:51 PM)bianca_notte Wrote: Hi everyone!

I’m currently researching for an Extended Project Qualification on the origins and appeal of Gothic Romance literature, and in particular it's place in the world of literature today. As contemporary readers (and, in some cases, writers) of this genre, I’d be really grateful if some of you could give me an insight into why you like this genre. Is there anything that, for you, characterises the genre, and sets it apart from others?

What for you is the appeal of reading Gothic Romance? Do you think it appeals more to people of a certain gender or age? In your opinion, do people view it as a serious form of literature, or merely as a light, enjoyable read?

Recently there has been an influx of popular novels, films and TV series’ about vampires, werewolves and other supernatural concepts, following the ‘Twilight’ phenomenon. Do you see this as a welcome revival of the genre to the modern teenage conscience? Or maybe you think it is spoiling hundreds of years of tradition?

And finally, how do you view the portrayal of women within Gothic Romance literature? In the past, authors have been accused of only creating 2-dimensional female characters that conform to the stereotype of either the ‘damsel in distress’ or the ‘femme fetale’ – how far do you agree with this criticism?

Obviously, these are just guidelines, and any opinions/comments anyone would like to make outside of this would also be greatly appreciated!
Thanks!
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#16
(01-06-2011, 08:00 PM)Alice Gaines Wrote: As far as vampires and werewolves...they've gone so far afield from the original they're a whole different animal. I don't consider them relevant to Gothics. I don't worry about Twilight. It is what it is and has no effect on me.
(08-24-2010, 01:51 PM)bianca_notte Wrote: Hi everyone!

I’m currently researching for an Extended Project Qualification on the origins and appeal of Gothic Romance literature, and in particular it's place in the world of literature today.


Interesting discussion.

I agree the Twilight books don't really capture what a true Gothic is all about. The best Gothics seem like they have paranormal elements, but real world explanations that may not be apparent until the last minute.

To me the elements of a good Gothic include:

1) A broody hero who appears to be guilty of murder/abuse/mental illness.

2) An intelligent but destitute heroine who is forced to live in the hero's home.

3) A strong romantic interest in each other in spite of the inappropriateness of a relationship between them.

4) A dangerous backdrop. Menacing house, treacherous cliffs, isolated moors, bogs, fog and storms.

5) A far-flung setting with few avenues of escape. So no cities or a lot of extra characters, who could help.

6) Suspicious deaths of current or past characters, such as a former wife, are always good.

And I hope I've captured all of those elements in my upcoming release TAINTED BY TEMPTATION ~ Avon books ~ 1.25.11 Rolleyes
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#17
Gothic scenery: castles, manors, graveyards/crypts and dark forests, historical settings - preferable Victorian England or Middle and Eastern Europe.
Gorgeous period costumes.
Escapism in the form of good clean fun.
I hope heroine has strong moral backbone. I would rather take sweet heroine who treats people like they are and not how they look and dark femme fatale who is not promoted as heroine than "strrrrong" heroine and abusive hero, but I am probably in minority. Scarlett O´Hara is popular, so are books by Nora Roberts. Twilight is often highlighted as shallow example of Lust never dies, but really, it´s not that different.
Katy, sorry if this sounds preachy, but... "guilty" of mental illness? It´s hardly a crime of being ill!
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#18
I find that I enjoy gothic novels now in my middle-age as much as I did when I was a girl. I liked different styles at diferent types, depending on my mood or the availability. As English is not my native language, most of the books I'd enjoy was impossible to find. Nowadays I can find almost everything - I rejoice in this Tongue

I'm aware that novels in general were regarded as light reading, I remember a time when I was advised to choose improving books, but I've descarded this notion as too mind-restricting. I don't try to censure my reading, whatever feels right, thrilling and enjoyable is welcome, provided it's well written and interesting.

Literature is never static, in my opinion. Today's reading is mostly influenced by what's on the movies or on the tube. Reading books on the supernatural (vampires/werewolves etc.) felt queer at first, but I quickly came to like it, depending upon the quality of the book, of course. Cann't really tell whether these books will stand the test of time, though, as many classic gothic have done.

I suspect their success was based partly on this rather flat portrayal of women Shy readers felt comfortable with the stereotypes. This is essential in gothic romances: the atmosphere may be as weird and as stimulating as possible but the feeling of cosiness is always there.


Please excuse my poor command of the language
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#19
(02-10-2011, 03:49 PM)romanticdress Wrote: Katy, sorry if this sounds preachy, but... "guilty" of mental illness? It´s hardly a crime of being ill!

No, you're right. I should have said appears to be guilty of murder/abuse or suffering from a mental illness. I didn't mean to make light of it, but just to say that the heroine can't be certain how the hero will treat her. Cool

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#20
Rather belated, but thought I might just let you know that, months after starting it, I've finally sent off my (now extensive!) project! I've learnt masses, and have definitely developed a taste for the Gothic after all this... Basically, I just wanted to say thank you to you all for replying - you helped me so much! Now I'm just crossing my fingers for a good grade!
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