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A few questions from a newcomer to the genre
#11
Thanks Penfeather. The search is on for that book!

Thanks to everyone for their input on this thread. But I would like to see the discussion continue, as I'm rather enjoying it.

Some of the covers are irresistibly intruiging. They really are like nothing I've ever known before -- their power to captivate. And like I've said, this power is surely greater on the male perspective.


(07-21-2010, 06:14 PM)GothicLover Wrote: FYI, 99.9% of the books sold as "romance" have a happy ending.

I should have mentioned that I did not really think about whether or not these books have happy endings. Romance? Of course, but because these are Gothic Romance, somewhere in the back of my mind I must have thought of the possibility of an unhappy ending.
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#12
Winter Castle - the cover is posted in the Cover Art Gallery - somewhere, that forum is pretty long, might take days to find it (not my scan)

   
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#13
(07-22-2010, 01:36 AM)lostintwilight Wrote: I should have mentioned that I did not really think about whether or not these books have happy endings. Romance? Of course, but because these are Gothic Romance, somewhere in the back of my mind I must have thought of the possibility of an unhappy ending.

In contrast to other romances, gothics can have unhappy, or tragic, endings. But, it takes a very good writer, with good plotting, to make a tragic ending work. As others have pointed out, there is a formula, but there are variations, so just because you've read one, it doesn't mean you've read them all. Happy reading, lostintwilight.
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#14
I totally agree with you about the witchcraft, etc stuff. There seemed to be a obsession in the 70s with gothics that contained plots about the occult and Satan. Those types of books totally turn me off as well. Reincarnation plots, too.

The classic artwork for these books are an art genre unto themselves. I think they're highly collectible. In fact, there is at least one blog dedicated to the covers of the gothic romantic suspense books ("Women Running from Houses")

There is a certain formula with gothics, but I think a talented author can take the formula and mold it to fit her needs and be unique and very enjoyable.

If you google: "Mystery File gothic romantic suspense paperbacks", a treasure trove of gothic novels (some, not all) from the 1960s through the 1980s are listed.
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#15
Thanks gothicromancereader for the website info. Great stuff!

I've been avoiding gothic romance published later than 1979, for the reason that I've heard publishers began putting the traditional cover on books that weren't true gothics because of high demand. Additionally, I'd like to avoid the gratious sex scenes that plague today's romances. Was the genre's Golden Era coming to a close by the close of the 1970's, or am I denying myself of a few more good books?
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#16
Many of my favorite gothics came from the late 70s-early 80s Candlelight Intrigue novels. Anne Stuart, Betty Hale Hyatt, Jacqueline Aeby, and Jannette Radcliffe (among others) wrote gothics for this line. Granted, some fall more into the "romantic suspense" category, rather than pure "gothic", but there are some really good books there.

You can find a listing of these Candlelight romances either by going onto the now defunct website thenonesuch.com or by going onto Fiction db.com. On Fiction db, on the right hand side of the page (under the login/sign in/help features) there's a pull down menu that automatically goes to "author", but you can chose "title", "series", or "isbn". If you select "series", key in "Candlelight" in the box.

Three choices come up, but you want the one is for "Candlelight Romance".
And all of the gothics/intrigues/regencies that they featured in their series of books will come up. If you click on a title, most of the books have a synopsis and the front book cover.
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#17
I have another question:
Are any of the authors known witches?
I hope this is not a ridiculous question, as I read on the front of a book (I don't know what it's called, but when praise is given to an author by a publisher or another author, etc.) something about the author being a witch. It seems like it was Charlotte Armstrong.
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#18
(07-27-2010, 12:56 AM)lostintwilight Wrote: I have another question:
Are any of the authors known witches?
I hope this is not a ridiculous question, as I read on the front of a book (I don't know what it's called, but when praise is given to an author by a publisher or another author, etc.) something about the author being a witch. It seems like it was Charlotte Armstrong.

I tried reading one Charlotte Armstrong book (I believe it was called The Witch's House) and gave up halfway through. It had been mis-marketed as a Gothic, and this wouldn't necessarily be a problem, but I simply didn't care for the book.

If you're seeking to avoid depictions of witchcraft or that sort of thing in your reading, I should warn you that Winter Castle, the book you were seeking to identify, does contain some elements of black magic in its plot, if memory serves me. I remember thinking that it was a good story marred by some absurd/contrived sequences.
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